What to do if your building has more than one legal address

The Authority is now requiring that the address appearing on the license, bond and lease match the 911 system and the deed for the property. This can be confusing when it differs from the mailing address for the leased premises.

Let’s look at an example. A corner multiple unit commercial building in Canandaigua has two street level commercial retail units along Beeman Street, 5 and 7 Beeman Street and one street level commercial retail unit along Main Street, 195 Main Street. It also has several residential apartment units on the second floor 6A, 6B and 6C. In this situation, the lease, bond and licensed premises must be “5-7 Beeman Street; 195 Main Street” as recited on the deed.

Let’s look at another example. A downtown multiple unit commercial building in LeRoy has two street level commercial retail units at  7 and 9 Main Street. The deed for the building lists the property as  7, 9, 11, and 13 Main Street. It also has several residential apartment units on the second floor. The street address for 7 Main Street will be a farm brewery. The street address at 7 Main Street will be an adjacent restaurant. In this situation, the lease, bond and licensed premises must be “7-13 Main Street, unit 7 Main Street” for the brewery and “7-13 Main Street, unit 9 Main Street” for the restaurant.

If the building has more than one legal address, the Authority requests that applicants additionally submit one or more of the following supporting documents with the original application:

  • All property tax bills for the building
  • Letter from 911 system verifying the address(es) in its system for the building as a whole
  • Deed for the building
  • Letter from the Post Office verifying mailing addresses associated with the building

The Examiner may request additional documentation at his or her discretion.

 

             Tracy_JongAbout Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.